What are you doing New Year’s Eve?

Celebrating New Year’s Eve with kids is certainly a change. But if you’re like me, a person who never put too much emphasis on the holiday itself, maybe you’re lacking ideas for making it ‘special’ for your kiddos. In truth, my desire to celebrate New Year’s Eve now that I have a little one comes more from extending the holiday season than it does from the idea of ringing in a new year, but I digress.

This year my child (newly 5) has more of an understanding of the day than ever before, so we decided to get crafty in preparation for the big night. Below are some of the ways we’ve to celebrate ringing in 2019!

New Year’s Eve Confetti Poppers!

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These are, by far, the biggest hit and they’re super simple! All you’ll need is cardboard tube (paper towel roll cut in half works fine!), a balloon, Washi tape and stickers (or decorating material of your choice) and confetti!

Assembly is pretty simple! Let your kiddos decorate the cardboard tube as they wish! Once their vision is complete, you’ll add the balloon.

Tie a knot in the end of the balloon as if you’ve filled it with air. Next, cut the tip of the balloon off. Attach the balloon to the end of the cardboard roll with tape and fill with confetti to pop!

Want to see it in action? Check out our video on Facebook (And like us while you’re there!).

Confetti Slime!

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I know, I know… slime is messy, but it doesn’t have to be! We have made slime so (SO) many times in our family and at Creative and Curious that I really feel confident we’ve got our slime recipe down to a mess-free(ish) science.

My favorite slime recipe is simple: one part glue (clear, glitter, glow in the dark, etc.) and one part liquid starch (Sta-Flo has worked fine). If we stick to a 1:1 ration, rarely do we need to adjust, but I believe key is in the mixing.

For this recipe, we poured a full (5oz) bottle of clear glue into a container and add pizazz (aka glitter, confetti, sparkles, etc.). Next, we added an equal amount of  the liquid starch. Pro Tip: To ensure a 1:1 ration, we simply reused the glue bottle. Using a funnel, we filled the 5oz bottle with our liquid starch to add to the mixture. Next, mix with a popsicle stick.confettislimeAt some point though, you’ve got to get your hands in it. Pour the mixture onto an art tray (or plastic plate) to knead with your hands. From our experience, mixing and playing with slime is the BEST way to get it to the right consistency.

If it feels too watery, I’ll throw a coffee filter underneath the surface to speed up the process and pick up extra liquid. Alternatively, you could add more glue in small increments if it’s watery as well. But if you child likes sensory play, I feel confident they’ll be okay taking matter (slime) into their own hands.

Wish Wands

Lastly, we made wish wands. We read the story The Night Before New Year’s and talked about our hopes for the new year. It wasn’t in the form of resolutions, but more like wishes for ourselves and our loved ones.

To make our wish wands, we cut clear contact paper into a star shape. The kids sprinkled glitter and arranged stars, confetti and other items onto the sticky side of the paper. We then covered it with another piece and trimmed that down to star size!

Older children can write their wishes on the border of the wand and you can get creative – adding ribbons, bells, beads, etc.

We added a paper straw as a handle and our Wish Wands were complete!

What are some of your favorite New Year’s traditions?

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Snow Day Play

It’s not easy being snowed in with a toddler. And if  you’re like me, you would prefer to stay in your pajamas and consume a lot of coffee on a day like this.

With that in mind, I want to share some ideas we’ve tried  for indoor snow play, so kids can get creative and caregivers can stay warm.  With a tray (cookie sheet works fine), a towel, water-resistant toys and some sand or kitchen utensils the possibilities are endless.

1) Snow People:

Making faces is a daily occurrence in our house. We make faces with ALL sorts of things (see our Making Faces Post for more ideas!). My daughter was thrilled with the idea of making faces in the snow using her Mr. Potato Head Parts.

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Don’t have Mr. Potato head parts? Get creative and gather other things. We actually prefer to use small plastic toys to use as facial features! Think Lego, plastic play foods/utensils, small toys, marbles, etc. – the possibilities are endless!

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2) Snow Art:

Let me start by saying, there is no wrong way to create art with snow. I  would simply set out paint, brushes, paper and snow and let your child explore the materials as they see fit. It’s a great early STEAM activity.

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The snow can be used to wet the watercolors or watercolors can be used to paint the snow. Either way it’s about the process, not the product.

If you have ice on hand – icicles are great, but so are ice cubes – this is another fun way to explore liquids and solids. Add salt and liquid watercolors (or food coloring) and watch a colorful ice sculpture take form.

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Ice Painting
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Ice Painting

3) Sand Toys:

Sand toys are another great way to explore snow indoors (so are cooking utensils, if you’ve packed summer toys away). You can bake a cake, scoop and mix and build with snow, just as you would sand. Again, lay a towel down and fill a large container or tray and let kids explore. Add vehicles and plastic figures to extend this activity – the possibilities are endless!

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4) Snow Hunt:

You can bury anything in the snow and have your child dig for it! It amazes me how this activity entertains over and over again. Take advantage of their interest level by hiding items for any target concepts. Above is a hunt for the /d/ and /c/ sounds, but you can easily hide letters, numbers, shapes or even sight words!

Helpful hint: Gloves are still necessary when inside! And if you don’t like messes (though it’s just water) the bathtub is a safe place to take these activities.

For more ideas, check out our Indoor Snow Play Pinterest board!

And please share with us some ideas you may have!

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